Technology And Child Abuse

One of the most interesting aspects that I’ve come across in my own investigations into organised child abuse has been its relation with technological advancements over the last 40 years.

It seems to me to be hardly a coincidence that the increased organisation and production of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) material coincided with the introduction of the home video (VHS and Betamax). This technology enabled CSA material to be distributed more widely and for the first time made it more easily available to anyone wishing to view it. This in turn made it a more economically viable underground industry.

Media technology evolves and becomes more sophisticated, so does the behaviour of the child abusers and the producers of CSA material.

Before the advent of home video, CSA material would have been in the form of still photographs and cine camera film. The cine camera film would have been harder to copy and distribute and the camera and the means to display the material would have been bulky and expensive. Only when the home video became affordable to most home owners could the production of CSA material, often using children from care homes, be produced, copied, distributed, and accessed on an industrial and economic viable scale.

Since the 1980s, media technology has made several further leaps which must have in turn seen similar changes in the behaviour of organised child abuse. The computer has made CSA material easier to duplicate and the internet has made it easier to distribute and much harder to spot this distribution.

But I think it is the increasing sophistication of mobile phone technology which must have had the greatest impact on the behaviour of child abusers since the home video revolution. It is so portable and potentially anonymous, it can in effect make any child abuser potentially a producer of CSA material.

If you accidentally come across CSA material (child pornography) please remember that it is evidence of a crime against children, and please report it to http://www.iwf.org.uk/ or http://ceop.police.uk/

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12 Comments

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12 responses to “Technology And Child Abuse

  1. sadly porn has always followed technology and in fact makes better use of it..re dvd interaction..i am alarmed as to why webcam sites where young women even underage ones are not closed down. there are sites where these young women parade naked and touch themselves and often set the broadcasts to private so that nonces can interact with them.

  2. the iwf do nothing same with newspapers and police…but there are other ways ie hacking groups , perhaps its no wonder that hacking groups have been targetted as a threat ..’enemies of commerce’ hacking groups have been called..CSA is a business dont forget.

  3. Strangely enough it was the consensual adult porn industry in the US that actually pioneered the use of video technology, and the Betamax/PAL tussle was settled by the industry too…Needless to say that in its early years the internet was mostly regarded as being used by academics, pornographers and neo-nazis…
    It would be fantastic if there was a Hacker group that worked exclusively to attack/destroy/nail paedo sites- one that was more effectual than Anonymous or Ceop (Ore!!!) and less dubious than the spooky Wikileaks…Wish I had the skills…

  4. Anon

    The technological advances also mean that it trivial for the Police to monitor Internet Activity and catch these perverts (if they want to and if they are not prevented from doing so by higher powers).

  5. justice

    So the answer is monitoring? Communications data bill is the answer then.

    Not in my universe.

    • That’s right, I’d never settle for sweeping state surveillance of all of us because of a handful of demented freaks, who are, in a sense, the state’s best friends in that regard; so horrible that people would accept the destruction of their civil and legal rights to put a stop to them- not unlike the phenomenon of terrorism…

    • Anon

      It’s already going on and has been for years.

  6. Pingback: Technology And Child Abuse | Tell About Abuse

  7. Hmmm

    “The computer has made CSA material easier to duplicate and the internet has made it easier to distribute and much harder to spot this distribution.”

    You think? There seems to have been an explosion of prosecutions for internet-related child porn over the last decade or so. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s the most common category of prosecuted sexual offence. The internet has certainly made the distribution of child porn easier and more widespread but this in turn has resulted in many more successful convictions than in the pre-internet age.