Op Pallial: Blinkered By Boundaries

You would imagine that if there had been one lesson learnt by the police over the last 5 months since the Jimmy Savile revelations became public, it would be that they need to look at paedophilia as a wider national problem and tackle it with a broader holistic approach. In fact, the last official report published by HMIC seemed to explicitly point out that the fractured perspectives of the regional police authorities was in part to blame for the failure on the part of the police to identify Jimmy Savile as a predatory paedophile.

Different police forces held individual pieces of the jigsaw puzzle and there was no national system to enable a central police organisation to pull all those pieces together and   form  the bigger picture. Savile, of course, is just the big high profile example. When it comes to policing the sexual abuse of children in the UK over the last 50 years it would seem that the authorities failed utterly to anticipate that child abusers might move around the country, leaving behind them any suspicion one regional police force might have and starting afresh in a different part of the country.

But surely that has changed, right ?

Well, you’d have thought so wouldn’t you? Right now there are several police operations investigating child abuse and as far as I’m aware, Operation Yewtree is the only one without geographical restrictions. (I’m happy to be corrected on this)

As an example, let’s look at Operation Pallial. Operation Pallial is investigating abuse in North Wales but you’d imagine that if they were presented with conclusive evidence that there was a very real connection between abuse in North Wales and abuse that took place at the same time just across the English border then they would have the foresight and operational latitude to include that in their investigations.

You might think that but you’d be wrong. As was clearly demonstrated in this article ‘Bryn Alyn Community (Holdings) Ltd’ there is a very obvious and clear connection between the child abuse that took place in the Wrexham area and that which took place at Cotsbrook Hall, just across the English border in Telford, Shropshire. The connection being that all those Children’s Homes were owned by the same company, and one of the directors of that company, John Allen, was convicted of child abuse.

The Operation Pallial police were made aware of this weeks ago so you would have thought with all the ‘lessons learnt’ they would have incorporated allegations of child abuse from Cotsbrook Hall under the Operation Pallial umbrella, right ?

Wrong!

Operation Pallial seems restricted to North Wales exclusively. As far as Operation Pallial is concerned the line on a map that divides Wales from England is a limiting factor in their investigations.

Child abuse is a national, even international problem and the sooner the police tackle it in an appropriate inclusive manner the quicker they will get to the bottom of it.

These piecemeal investigations will not enable the police to get a grip on the situation and as a consequence, victims from the past will not receive justice, and children today, right now, will be put in danger.

Please also read Emma’s submission to The Macur Review- Here

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26 Comments

Filed under Abuse, Fairbank, Fernbridge, News, Pallial, Yewtree

26 responses to “Op Pallial: Blinkered By Boundaries

  1. kaz

    I informed Pallial, Macur, Children’s Commissioner for Wales and the Social work team attached to Pallial that this was a serious oversight.

  2. richard cockerill

    Could this geographical limitation also be linked to the fact that there was a very credible interview on sky news with a victim (not Stephen Messham) who claims he and other children were regularly driven in a “sunshine club” minibus to London and abused by toffs there?

    • I remember that interview.

      Interesting point, Richard.

      • richard cockerill

        Stephen Messham has not “twittered” since 14th of December. I wonder why ? By the way Stephen, if anyone in my family had been threatened I would do the same as you! Sensible move! I know how much you have been victimised – it beggars belief!

  3. I have serious problems with you people There is an immense issue alive in our world, the grotesque evil of systematic abuse of children; are you a part of this evil (like national and local government and charitable agencies) or are you agencies for good.

    • Hi David,

      I don’t want a blog war with Chris Spivey. Please don’t use this blog to attack someone else. The article above is an important piece and I don’t want it to deteriorate into a shitstorm argument.

      • If you wish to discuss my moderation then please email me David.

        gojam56@gmail.com

      • cantankerous

        Nice try Gojam, but anyone reading your blog as closely as I have over recent months can see exactly what is going on, you only posted that last comment after I tweeted you to pack it in.I put it to you that you and David share the same ISP ie. you are one and the same . “David” is a device you use to big up you blog and belittle others, bloggers and csa survivors alike. I am sure you will deny it but if anyone wants to look back at earlier posts it is blatant. You have never intervened before but now people are starting to catch on. It is a shame as your blog is excellent and stands up on the merit of it’s content alone without these silly games. I realise you are trying to distance yourself from Icke and Spivey as you seek approval from the likes of Exaro and Paraic O Brien. Ambition is to be applauded but not at the expense of others.
        Other blogs just do not have visitors that heap praise on the blogger but slag off others within the AM day, after day after day.

      • I don’t read your tweets.

  4. richard cockerill

    A raw nerve seems to have been hit here?

  5. richard cockerill

    Two trolls a trilling?

  6. Slightly O/T, but not by much- It appears that European websites and news outlets are talking about Elm House, which is more than they’re doing in the UK, plus No.10 is ‘closely following events’…I bet they are. See this-

    http://hat4uk.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/revealed-in-full-connections-from-the-rocks-lane-of-yesteryear-to-the-coalition-cabinet-today/

  7. Callie

    The fracturing of police intelligence is down to the way our police forces are organised – on a county basis. We don’t really have a national police force, and this is by no means the first time that the shortcomings of the county constabulary system has been shown up.

    • iwantthetruth

      My husband left the Police system when it was ordered to be referred to as a Police FORCE rather than Police SUPPORT. He joined in 1954 as a police cadet to support and help his local community. He then did 2 years National Service and returned to his originally Police Authority with medals.

      Of course he enforced the law – but he would never work for The Powers That Be. He was offered another promotion to stay as he was excellent at his job. He chose the dole rather than comply! I believe he was a very brave man. He re-trained as a teacher and worked tirelessly to prevent children from entering ‘the sytem’.

      He worked to expose Ritalin abuse in the ‘secure system’ (along with other good people).

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  9. Talia48

    The article keeps mentioning “the police” are looking into things, but do we really trust these thugs in uniform to dig deep under the surface? If they are anything like the idiots patrolling hour streets her in the US I wouldn’t count on anything getting done!

  10. Anon

    As a target of a different type of persistent crime, my experience (and that of so many other victims) is that the police are utterly appalling at joining dots. Cross county, cross neighbourhoods, across time, it’s all the same. They do very badly at fitting jigsaw pieces together. Mostly, they don’t even recognise jigsaw pieces.

    Worse, instead of realising their failures, they ignore, bully and intimidate victims and witnesses to try and suppress reports of repeated crimes.

    Fundamentally, our police are not fit for purpose. Unless that purpose is testosterone-fuelled high-speed car cases, dishing out speeding tickets, mixing it with late night, town centre drunken louts – and actively getting tough on not crime but victims and their reports of crime. All the while blaming the CPS.

    Tragically, Britain’s epidemic paedophilia is just one of the many areas these failures are manifest.

    I’d be happy to say all this to any Chief Constable face to face. I would be speaking for the vast majority of crime victims who exist in an ocean of misery because of these failures.
    .

  11. chess

    I hate to say this, but my experience of this county’s police force is that they are less than proactive. When I was being terrorised by neighbours from hell for a number of years, including having poison poured under the garden fence that killed a shrubbery (the least of the hounding), the police told me that their CC’s edict was that it was not criminal damage because it could be put right.
    Similarly, I suppose, with the cast iron drain cover that was thrown at my car, the car could have been repaired so would not have counted as criminal damage .
    I pushed it as far as I could but apparently CPS said that my case was not strong enough. I guess the oicks would have had to kill me before a case could be mounted.
    For several generations my family and I have been (younger generations still are) career Govt employees, including police, prison, courts and armed forces, social, nursing and mental health services, and voluntary workers outside of their day to day work, real law abiding, old fashioned morals types.
    Now I wonder who are the real oicks.
    I know for cetain that ‘we’ must be the fools.
    Still battling though! Oh, yes.

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  13. Jon

    Our society’s problem is that we treat this subject as so taboo that it just doesn’t get the recognition it needs. By my rough calculation there are at least 750,000 people in the UK who are attracted to children with this figure more likely to be over 1,000,000.

    These people need the freedom to admit their sexuality so that they don’t need to hide beneath the radar. Many marry into dead-end relationships because of the fear of exposure and it’s this apparent normality that masks the figures above. It also makes the situation more dangerous because it fragments our understanding of the issue. These people do not choose their sexuality, but they can choose not to abuse. A very BIG difference, sadly one our society cannot grasp.

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